January 9 - March 4, 2017

 
 

Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA

 
 
 
 
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February 24 - April 27, 2017

 
 

Projective Eye Gallery - University of North Carolina
Charlotte, North Carolina, USA

 
 
 
 
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May 7 - August 31, 2017

 
 

Multisite installation, ARTsPLACE,
Annapolis Royal, NovaScotia, Canada

 
 
 
 
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July 31 - October 14, 2017

 
 

Madart Seattle
Seattle, Washington, USA

 
 
 
 

 

The environment is under assault. In Bill McKibben’s 1989 book, The End of Nature, he suggests that we have entered a new historical stage in which no square inch of Earth can correctly be called “natural.” Beyond the effects and ramifications of climate change, air and water pollution that will affect our ability to survive and inhabit the planet, how does the loss of the “natural” affect our psyche? McKibbons writes, “By changing the weather, we make every spot on earth man-made and artificial. We have deprived nature of its independence, and that is fatal to its meaning. Nature’s independence is its meaning; without it there is nothing but us.”

Increasingly, we see consideration given to biomorphism in architecture. We long to bring the outside inside, whether it be to our homes or work spaces. Super Natural is intended to be a temple to nature. A sacred space can be comforting, exhilarating and terrifying all at the same time. It is my intention to create a space to astonish, to contemplate, to learn and to preserve.

 
     
 
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August 19 – Nov 11, 2017

 
 

516 Arts
Albequerque, New Mexico, USA

 
 
 
 

 

The pattern I have created for Cross Pollination is broken. A kind whirlwind exists within it that eventually erupts creating disorder and chaos. I am referencing man’s fragility or ephemeral state on this planet. We need insects to survive. They pollinate flowers that in turn produce fruit. Seventy percent of the food we consume is the result of insect pollination. The world is starting to wake up to the devastating tragedy that awaits us all if colony collapse, the death of millions and millions of honeybees goes on unabated. The role of insects in decomposing matter is not to be underestimated either. Our world would become a massive trash heap without insects and the human race would no longer exist.

 

 
 
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